Dr. Boyd Seevers, a professor in the Biblical and Theological Studies department at the University of Northwestern – St. Paul, is married and has four children.  In addition to family he also has a wide array of interests that include biblical studies, archeology, genealogy, and participating in marathons and Ironman triathlons.  In talking about the Bible, Seevers said, “The thing that interested me the most was understanding the history of the Bible in the world of the Bible.  When we as Americans read it, we understand it, but we see it from the perspective of our world. And we try to interpret it from our world whereas if you go to the world of the Bible and get to know that world better, that is, the people and the land and the customs, the weather and all those things, the Bible is clearer to us in that kind of context.”  Seevers studied in Israel during his education, then went back and lived there with his family for seven years. Now, he takes trips back to Israel. He said, “There are many things in the Bible that we don’t understand, and part of that is because that difference in perspective of worldview and sometimes my experience over there can help explain that.”  Gillian McIntosh, a public relations major who took minor prophets from Seevers, said that “he would always talk about his trips,” and that it “made him seem more credible,” and that he “had a story or an anecdote to go with what he was teaching.”

In talking about the Bible, Seevers said, “The thing that interested me the most was understanding the history of the Bible in the world of the Bible.  When we as Americans read it, we understand it, but we see it from the perspective of our world. And we try to interpret it from our world whereas if you go to the world of the Bible and get to know that world better, that is, the people and the land and the customs”

Seevers also enjoys running Ironman triathlons and marathons. He said, “You have to train for months for either of them, and you do that because you enjoy the training, not all of it but most of it. And then you appreciate the challenge and it’s terribly rewarding.”  Currently, he does it with the charity “World Vision.”  He continued, “They do relief work largely in Africa, but it’s greater than that. Part of World Vision has athletes like myself who dedicate a marathon or an Ironman or something like that and raise money for that relief work as they’re training. Last year, in the Twin Cities, the marathon and half-marathon teams raised $996,000. I’m doing this because I think it’s fun and healthy, and I do it in a way that does great human good.”  Genealogy, the study of family history, is also one of Seevers’s interests. “My ancestors came from Germany and my wife’s came from Sweden and we have some from England and I also enjoy researching that too,” he said.  Last summer, Seevers helped supervise an archeological dig in Israel. Additionally, two Northwestern graduates were there with him. During the archeological excavation, they uncovered a four foot tall storage jar that Seevers says was probably used to store water or grain. This summer, the archeological team he works with will be going to dig at Shiloh. He said, “Northwestern students are welcome to come and help dig and tour Israel.” Interested students should e-mail Seevers for more information.

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